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Money — at least in the modern world — is still a valuable resource to conserve, no matter what type of prepper you are. These days, especially with a slumping economy, high unemployment, and some unknowns on the horizon resulting from world conflicts and a wildly unpredictable presidential election, it’s important to keep some extra cash on hand. Just in case.

But it’s not just cash. There are a lot of things around your house that can (and should) be utilized, recycled, or completely cut out altogether. In today’s tip, we’re going to cover a few ideas that can help you live the minimalist lifestyle for each part of your house.

Prepping Resources in Your Bedroom

The idea of keeping old clothing might be crazy to some, but to a certain extent, it may be a good idea. Yes, it’s a good idea to throw away anything that is full of holes or is torn to the point where it can’t be utilized for something else, but if there’s a chance it can be used as, say, an extra wound dressing in an emergency or even as a patch for a tent or other clothing, it might be worth keeping around. This will also allow you to keep yourself from having to buy new clothes for destructive work or wearing around the house (of course, you might not want to wear these things in public unless you can get away with it).

Clean out and Maximize Your Kitchen

The most important thing to do here is say no to breakable glass or easily cracked plastics wherever possible. Metal is the way to go for the majority of your dishes. You’ll only need one set each of cups, spoons, knives, plates, etc. per person, so you can discard, sell, or donate anything you don’t need. For measuring cups, spatulas, and spoons, you should keep only one of each type. Again, you can sell or get rid of anything you don’t need. This will allow you to more easily inventory the dishes you do have and should also make plenty of room for some additional spots for keeping food storage or water storage.

Make smart investments, like heavy duty cast iron skillets and stainless pots. Sturdy pots and pans will last longer. You can also conserve a little by getting, say, only a few pots, skillets, and a dutch oven.

For food, we all know food with a long shelf life is important, but if you’re like most families, you buy canned goods. Make sure those with less shelf life are eaten first (or donated if you don’t need them) so they don’t expire needlessly.

Emergency Food Supply, Disaster preparation, Food Storage Kits

Bathrooms for Preppers

An interesting thing about bathrooms is that they’re some of the safest places to be in a tornado, but they’re also places where we keep a lot of unnecessary junk. By ridding yourself of hair dryers, curling irons, or anything you don’t really need, you can live the minimalist lifestyle that many preppers have started to live.

Electricity

Utilize wind turbines or solar panels instead of living off the grid. This not only serves as protection against blackouts, but also helps you save money for other prepping activities.

Entertainment

Entertainment is essential in disaster situations. It keeps us sane. Aside from games, most of us have movies and music in our homes. The best way to maximize your ability to store and utilize these items is by either getting a plastic tub to store your movies — the tub can be used for something else later — or by digitizing your entire collection, which lets you take your movies with you all at once on a laptop, tablet, or even smartphone. Books are the same way and can be transferred to Kindle or another ebook reader for easy viewing. This is especially important for prepper books like these that will allow you to hone prepping skills.

For saving money, pay for streaming services such as Hulu, Netflix or Amazon Prime Video if you must, but ditch the cable, which is overpriced and is a very large monthly expense that, when dropped, should maximize your available budget for prepping activities.

What other ways have you minimized your budget and embraced the prepper lifestyle?