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"Your Survival & Preparedness Specialists"

In Part 5 of our gardening indoors series, prepper series, we’re going to be giving you step by step instructions on growing eggplant. Eggplant is another of those very interesting plants that can actually thrive indoors, making it the perfect plant option for prepping your apartment or home. Eggplants should be planted in 5-gallon plastic buckets or pots placed where they can receive good sunlight for eight hours a day. You should start the eggplant in a small pot, and then later transfer to a larger pot, as we’ve done in the steps below.

  1. Fill your small plant pots with a soil mix allowing the soil to remain loose.
  2. Use your finger to press a hole 1/2 inch deep into the soil.
  3. Place two seeds into each hole (one for backup in case the other doesn’t grow).
  4. Cover the seeds with soil, patting slightly.
  5. Dampen the soil with water (don’t get it too wet).
  6. When your seeds sprout and have two sets of leaves, decide which seed (if both have grown) is the one you wish to keep and cut the weaker one down to the dirt — don’t pull it, lest you damage the seedling.
  7. Transplant eggplants into larger pots once they’re 1/2 foot tall. You will likely require the use of a tomato cage or stake to keep the plant from tipping.
  8. In the center of the larger pot, dig a hole in the soil that is as deep and wide as the small pot you started your seed in.
  9. Wet the soil in the smaller pot so that it is compact and easy to work with.
  10. Remove the seed and the soil from the smaller pot by wiggling the entire works out slowly.
  11. Place the seedling into the hole you dug in the center of the big pot, keeping the seedling standing up straight.
  12. Pack the soil, again keeping the seedling standing up straight.

Make sure you water your eggplant on a daily basis. A tomato cage will be required if the plant starts to tip. The length of time it takes for an eggplant to reach maturity varies but you can harvest your eggplant when its skin appears glossy. Use a pair of pruning shears to remove the plant from the vine.